Wed, 7 Jul 2004 07:46:20 -1000

Hi Pygoya,

 

Sorry for the faux pas about fractals--I see the difference in that and your art, really, but like I said, I don't really know how to talk

about abstract art and can only bring up my limited frame of reference. In any event, your opening does appear to be a resounding

disappointment and I know the feeling. I recently had a one-man show at Pauahi Tower and as I hung my canvases, people

streamed in and out of their offices and NOT ONE person showed the slightest curiosity about the art. It is actually my observation

of many years that the average John or Jane Doe doesn't really give a rip about art ---the apathy or unawareness or whatever it is--

translates across the board to all genre. So while you might feel it is especially so for digital art, I really think it is the case for all

art. Well, if you do become acclaimed after you're gone from this world, you won't be the first of the great artists to be appreciated

after the fact!

 

I went yesterday to see the Artists of Hawaii exhibit at the Academy. Ugh to most of them. I was interested in the various media and

techniques but the subject matter.....who is this artist named "I Made Sumayasa?" Is that a sentence or really a name? He/She had

two paintings of acrylic and inks on canvas and one of them would give you nightmares to have that thing hanging in your house.

Wild boars raping women, cannibalism, torture--the handcarved wood frame was the nicest thing about it. I think it was already sold

for six thousand. Still yet, I liked the idea of putting inks and acrylics on unprimed canvas. I might try that. And then there was the

award-winning painting called "Anger." It was in the Sunday paper. The Medusa-like head that had, upon close

inspection, tombstones, a swastika, syringes, blood pressure kit, etc. My blood pressure went up just viewing the painting. The

product, i.e., the painting itself was a tour de force of a technique that I would not know how to do. It appears to have been air

brushed because the surface was meticulously rendered. It must have taken Lynda Hess months and months to paint it and, given

the subject matter, she also must have been hell to live with during those months. She probably snarled at her husband and kicked

the dog while the painting was in progress! Funny thing though was that the Juror said artists in Hawaii, judging from the submitted

works, were a placid peaceful bunch or something like that, unlike those from New York. Our level of anger as expressed in the

submitted works was quite low, she thought. Lucky we live Hawaii, wild boars notwithstanding.

 

Oh well, I should talk. I only started painting about 8 years ago and took lessons at Linekona Art Center from Alan Leitner who is

now a Big Name. He is a nice guy and can teach traditional techniques although he himself paints abstractly with wax, and then

scumbles black and white paint on it. His benefactor was the wife of Twigg-Smith--I believe she is deceased now because there is

an ode to Layla after she died by Roy Venters. I can't remember where I saw that work. (I like Roy Venters too.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Priscilla